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an environment that will be welcoming of the new economy, technology, and innovation to reinforce what we have been saying. we are the innovation capital of the world. with your help and involvement. we would like to have the rest of the city picked up and be part of it as well. we think we can have that conversation. we will need your help. we will need you to represent the new industry. these companies are here to keep the dialogue and collaboration at a high-level going with us. it is the ongoing dialogue like the one we are reading about a new tax structure for the city that does not punish the inventiveness we want to have. i would like to open with that introduction, welcome all of you here. i think he will see and hear an exciting introduction of these new companies. they're going to raise questions we do not have the answers to yet, but i do believe we have the spirit in this city to welcome solutions with your involvement. we will have the ability to do this on line as well is in these forums. i will be part of the ongoing discussion. i want to see all of you interact with the city an
" that sprung from the awful doldrums of the u.s. economy under jimmy carter apply stronger, more strongly today. >> house so click >> obama is the same kind of antibusiness president and insight president. same kind of managerial, interfering, strangling, surprising president jimmy carter was. >> you writing here about president obama. i want to get to the right page so i can quote it correctly, sir. you write under the obama administration that the u.s. had a morbid subversion of the infrastructures of its economy. the public sector has become a manipulative forest, aggressively intervening in the venture and financial sectors with guarantees and subventions that attract talent and debunking. >> the worst of this is the korean cast of the obama administration. the epa now has gained control over everything. see so to have been deemed a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald
city initiatives -- you know, this -- the schering economy working group will interface with or connect with, and how does it fit in with existing strategic goals and plans of the city? >> i think our director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think about the economic impact of these new business models, it can contribute quite greatly to that. i am going to answer the question a little bit differently -- i have been inspired by this space considerably. there's a lot more opportunity. cars, so many assets we have in our society. as a city, we own buildings, cubicles, museums, golf courses, so much that we have -- >> yes, but it is our property, right? >> yes. that is a very good point. stewards of these resources, and they are often underutilized resources, so how do we improve access to those? there is a lot to learn from this that could be applied to the public comments. >> thank you. let's open it up. do we have a microphone for people to come to? ok, we will just it old school. if yo
. they are studying the evolution of specialization as they uncover details of ancient economies around the world. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic systems are simply the ways people produce, distribute and consume things -- everything and anything, from tortillas to stocks and bonds. for 10,000, 10,000 an eighth. today, as in the past, economic systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe econ
to do. we're proud to be here, part of the sharing economy, and hearing from you guys as well. >> i am the director of public policy at air b &b. it is an online community market place where residents can lift their haul -- list their homes for rent when they are out of town. i am travelling next week and plan on listing my apartment for rent to a visitor. these hosts are in 19,000 cities. the use the income to afford the increasing cost of living, whether paying off your mortgage, paying rent, or expanding income. travels who use the service are looking for a different experience from a hotel. we have hosts in every single neighbor had in the city -- neighborhood in the city that offers authentic experiences. the hosts take pride in being unofficial ambassadors of their neighborhoods. the visitors enjoy the experience. the state average of five nights. that is twice the average of the hotel guests. they patronize local businesses and experience of the city has to offer. -- experience all the city has to offer. >> i am one of the founders of get around. we are a marketplace for cars sh
. appreciate your time today. >>> when we return, what happens to the global economy if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff? >> markets i think would react very quickly. >> we'll talk to the woman who's keeping a close watch. my interview with imf chief christine lagarde is next. reti. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ at the chevy year-end event because chevy's giving more. more efficiency with sonic and cruze... more function in equinox and traverse... more dependability with the legendary silverado... and more style in the all-new malibu. chevy's giving more at the year-end event because 'tis the season. chevy's giving more. this holiday season, get a 2013 cruze ls for around $169 per month or get $500 holiday bonus cash. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting th
their parents. this. the weekend the american economy is not creating any jobs of any kind -- enough jobs of any kind. to many americans cannot have the skills they need. the path to a prosperous middle class is a combination of a vibrant economy that creates and positive role. federal policies on the national debt, taxes and regulations, allclass job creation. opening and growing a business. they are afraid of getting hit with a massive tax increase to pay off this debt. one of the leading causes of our growing future debt is the way medicare is currently designs for the future -- designed for the future. the sooner we act, the likelier we can do it without making any currently in the system, like paul ryan's and my mother. a complicated tax code is also hampering the creation of jobs. you cannot open a business if uncertain. that is allied i oppose the present's plans to raise taxes the -- that is why i oppose the dent in the debt. over half of the private sector workers and america work for the plans will raise taxes on. we should a follow the examplewe should keep rates low on everyone, simp
place to be once they settle this thing. the third and the most important thing is the u.s. economy is the most vibrant, adaptable, innovative and creative economy on the planet. i think that means we're coming out and starting to see that in many sectors today. we're bullish and think you need to look at this on a positive frame. >> maria, i'm less bullish than that. that sounds very optimistic. i would love to believe that, but if you compare valuations of equities versus bonds, yes, there's a huge spread right now, but that doesn't necessarily make equities really cheap. it's just a relative trade. i think, also, yes, we're a vibrant economy. we certainly are a strong economy. i think it's really unsustainable, the level of debt that we have in this country. we have $1 trillion in debt. i heard an incredibly succinct way of describing this. rick santelli actually said it this morning about how you can't say you're cutting $800 billion when really $80 billion is really from wars that are just going away. that's not really a cut. that's taking away the addition. i think you need to
of the excheck kerr. >> mr. speaker, it's taking time, but the british economy is healing. [laughter] after the biggest financial crash of our lifetime, people know that we face each problem at home and abroad. at home we live with the decades of debt and the failure to equip britain to compete in the modern world. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as,
be aboutthe economy and working americans, 98% pass the bill. they have the assurance that they will not be subjected to an increase in taxes january 1. this will give them confidence and it will add immeasurably to the confidence of our economy and that is why we ought to do it. it is not a question of a tactical advantage. it is a question of whether working americans will have the assurance that they will still have the resources to anticipate growing the economy. >> every movement has to have an answer. why can we come together as the american people want us to? i think that we continue to focus on the middle class. we continue to defend and stand for the middle class moving towards what we have in the fall right now with the mohsen -- the motion to discharge. but as the legislation that has already passed the u.s. senate. we should move on that and then we have other things to deal with this year. to send a message to the american people, it is time to move forward and get down to doing the business of the people of this country. >> i don't think the issue of disp
% -- 10%, 20%, 40%. it is not too much to ask. we could see the economy and americans with some certainty. >> do you think the economy stays or goes down in little bits? do you believe the economy could withstand the effects of allowing the bush tax cuts to expire for all americans, even temporarily? >> that is not all of the discussion. the fiscal cliff would affect 27 million american families. there are other parts of this. when you hear about the fiscal cliff, it is not really the tax rate. i do not buy that at all. i do not think we need to increase these tax rates. >> if you go over and the tax rates go up on everyone and all that goes away -- >> i do not think we should do it. i think we should resolve this. it depends on if we do something about it in the next month or two after that. if we do something in 30 days or 90 days and we are clear about that, but nothing people believe we are going to do something until we do it. >> the to go to the broader concern. does the top rate have to end the 39.6% the way it was under bill clinton? could be democrats accept something between if
answer in today's economy" elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal experience, particularly when it comes to economics. >> i've been a finance journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and have my own pr business and they've also done projects, communication projects with clients. among them, co-authored the book. basically i were to steve forbes and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepreneur, i learned about the fact that you really need to have economic freedom to create jobs. someth
the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal
that we need to go forward in getting our economy turned around, in reducing our deficit in creating jobs. so i think when jim deminute looked around, he looked and saw a future where he would be standing by himself very often and likely face ago dwindling even greater dwindling number of tea party advocates and allies. i think he headed for the doors because he thinks that probably, as he said, the only way he's going to have a significant impact is through a think tank. >> to switch over to your side of the capitol the house of representatives, the tea party there seems to be playing defense. i know alan west, one of your close buddies was upset that he lost, he is gone. how does it feel when you look at john boehner the speaker republican leader and he knows every day that the tea party which had held him hostage the last two years the tea party in the house is playing defense, as well it seems. >> well, i was playing more than defense. unfortunately it feels like in the house the tail continues to wag the dog. you still seem to have a leadership on the republican side in the house led
to develop north korea's economy. >> translator: we must start on a path of industrial revolution for the new century to make north korea a great economic power. >> reporter: but there are no tangible signs of improvement. the u.n. world food program says 16 million north koreans, or nearly 70% of the population, suffer from malnutrition. north korea's relations with the outside world are at a standstill. last february the united states agreed to provide food aid in exchange for a freeze on ballistic missile tests. but the deal was broken after the north tested a missile in april. north korea's leadership has been trying to hold direct talks with the united states, but officials in washington said they are not ready to accept. china is also applying pressure on its neighbor. arguing that the missile launch would violate u.n. resolutions. >>> several japanese ships have headed to southwestern japan to get ready for the launch. they're carrying intercepter missiles. a maritime self-defense force vessel arrived at ishiyaki equipped with surface to air missiles. the flight path could take it over
. are unemployment checks going to stimulus the economy. house minority leader nancy peel pole said yes. >> it is more injected by unemployment insurance. >> okay, to get this number down, get the number of people on these lines that you are looking at up. how is that going to work. i am cheryl casone and welcome to cashin in . joining us is trace yejohn and christian dorsey . welcome to all of you. tracey, benefits the best form of stimulus, really, you agree with that? >> the only thing that jobless stimulus benefit is apathy it is it easier to stay at home and collect a check than work at mcdonalds. we are so lazy these days, take 99 weeks was a freebey. we saw it with the hostess union guys. we rather take unemployment than take consessions. >> wayne, the benefits are so crucial we should extend them and not keep them in place but give more of a hand out to the unemployment for the reasons of saving the economy. >> i have a better idea. have everybody stand on the corner with a bag of cash. it is idiotic and nancy pelosi, she is a -- econist. that is it a guy who drives the car by l
of saving the economy. >> i have a better idea. have everybody stand on the corner with a bag of cash. it is idiotic and nancy pelosi, she is a -- econist. that is it a guy who drives the car by looking in the rear view mirror and goes around and seriously she's more interested in "saving the economy" than doing something correct or doing it right. by the way, recentl and i saw this on ather network, forgive me, they were talking about unemployment and t they were saying that the idea of unemployment insurance stretching out to 99 weeks where they wod start a guy in the midwest in manufacturing and start somebody on a job . they would train him agree to train him if he was not skilled . that tells you about the federal training programs . get him a job. no, we rather collect the unemployment. >> one of my fave identity economist is it christian dorsey . this is a perfect question for you i got to say. every dollar that they take in they will spend and there is it an economic benefit and i believe you agree with that as well. >> i is not that controversial. who sonot drawing in econom
, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. they have public on their side. but if you talk to people in washington, there's still this sense that at a last minute, reason will prevail, but there's not a lot of optimism. you know this and my colleagues know this, more and more people are talking about the threat. not only if you don't deal with this, you'll send the united states back in a recession, but that the global economy is teetering. they
? and what are the consequences for the economy if there isn't one? we'll ask the president's lead budget negotiator, treasury secretary tim geithner. >>> then the view from capitol hill. are democrats as divided over cutting medicare as republicans are over tax increases? with us, two voices calling for compromise. republican senator bob corker of tennessee and democratic senator claire mccaskill of missouri. >>> finally, our special economic roundtable. as both sides battle over the nation's fiscal health, what can we expect from the economy in a second obama term? what is the vision for an economic rebound? >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press" with david gregory. >>> and good sunday morning. amidst a lot of partisan rhetoric on both sides, talks on the fiscal cliff are now at a stand still, and the president is back on the campaign trail of sorts. this time to try to win in a court of public opinion for his plan to avert an automatic tax hike for everyone on january 1. that's where we'll start this morning with the po
a tremendous opportunity to make sure that we hand off a thriving economy to our kids. i mentioned that it we were to run $600 billion deficit for the next 10 years, by the end of that, the debt -- it would lower our gdp forecasts. if we were to cut with the fiscal consolidations that $600 billion deficit to $300 billion, we would be buying future generations gdp growth in the long run. by about half a% per year. it is ultimately a question of what kind of world we want to live in 10 years from now. if you want to look like the way europe has been growing, we will have a small consolidation, such as the small consolidation proposed by the president. if you want to have the kind of growth that i hope we can have with a bigger consolidation, that one is being proposed by speaker boehner. >> thank you. >> i would like to focus on something that is probably more of interest to the economists and ordinary people. let's talk about ratios. what i heard you lay out, dr. zandi, was more of an ideal situation. they get you at roughly at $3 trillion. deficit-reduction over the course of 10 years. you we
materials and technology lad a bit. the u.s. economy added 146,000 jobs in november as the unemployment rate dropped to four year low of 7.7%. today's report may not be as strong as it seemed, reporting employers added 49,000 fewer jobs in september and october than initially estimated. a preliminary reading showing consumer confidence plunging to its lowest level in four months. early december americans prepare for a potentially higher taxes at the beginning of next year. the index dropping 74.5 this month, far below november's reading of 82.7 and economists forecasts of 82.4. >> in the pits of the cme, michael tells us why dividend paying stocks are taught play regardless of next year's tax rate and charlie will share why he is bullish despite short-term volatility but let's start with phil at the cme. the dow did well today. better than expected, arguably better than expected, jobs report boosting the markets but we got consumer confidence and the fiscal cliffhanging over everything. what did you make of the markets today? >> i was disappointed we failed on that rally and shot up 1421 and
can count on. ♪ could push the u.s. economy behind the times. plus, a preview of what stocks investors are looking to own after ringing in the new year. the sudden flow of one hundred dollar bills is indicating a rise in fishy activity. and, bring on the breakout. are the markets poised for a swing to the upside? first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's wednesday, december 5th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: standstill. that's what's happening with the budget talks in washington, and it's reflected on wall street. stocks barely budged yesterday. gold, however, was a major mover. what that tells traders is coming up in the show. pandora hit a sour note with investors last night. shares plunged after the company revealed a loss of advertising money as lawmakers fail to find harmony over averting the fiscal cliff. the brand new dreamliner is under review after making an emergency landing in new orleans due to a mechanical glitch. larry shover of sfg alternatives joins us now on this wedn
deal. >>> the auto industry is back. what it is doing right even in a soft economy. we will find out what is driving profitability. >>> and curtains up on the billion dollar women who made the lion roar. my conversation with julie taymor. >> it's made 4 to $6 billion no no one complained about it. >> >> "wall street journal report" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program "wall street journal report." no now, maria bartiromo. >> here's a look at what is making news. some surprisingly good news about america's economy. the labor department says 146,000 new jobs were created in november. much better than economists' expectations. the unemployment rate drop theed 2/10 of a percent now at 7.7%. the best number since december of twachlt the labor department says superstorm sandy had little affect on those numbers. >>> the markets continue their familiar pattern of following the latest word or words or hopes on the fiscal cliff. no major moves during the week, but several times the market ran out of steam toward the end of the trading session. as for the fis
a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy s
, what happens to the global economy if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff? >> markets i think would react very quickly. four sixteen seventy six a month! okay, come with me -- we're gonna save you money. with straight talk at walmart, you get unlimited talk, text and data for only $45 a month per phone. would we get the same coverage? same coverage on america's best networks. you saved $146.76 by switching to straight talk. awesome! now you can afford to share your allowance with me. get the season's hottest smartphones like the samsung galaxy s2 and get straight talk with unlimited data for just $45 a month -- from america's gift headquarters. walmart. ♪ at chevy's year-end event, we have 11 vehicles that offer an epa-estimated 30 mpg highway or better. yeah? hey. hey. where's your suit? oh, it's casual friday. oh. [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. this holiday season, get a 2013 malibu ls for around $199 per month, or get $1,000 holiday bonus cash. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup c
balanced deficit reduction package that will do enormous good to our economy. and the kind of package that i should not leave out, that includes targeted investments so our economy continues to grow and create jobs. it would, as i said on a number of occasions, deficit reduction in an of itself is not a goal, it should be part of an economic plan is that is focused on economic growth and job creation. the president is very focus odden that. >> just a second ago, you referred to, when talking about the debt ceiling, taking it off the table, to be part of the deal. you referred to the economy being held hostage. you're aware that president obama voted against -- >> we addressed that. there was no threat of default at the time. what happened in 2011, as we all know because we all lived it, most of us in this room, was the threat of default, a willingness expressed by many to see the american economy under default and with all the consequent impacts on the global economy and on the american middle class. . in order to do that and was enormously damaging to consumer confidence.
implementations for the economy. cheryl: i can hear the hesitancy in your voice. a lot of our guests are saying the same thing. they are afraid of what washington will do or maybe not do. your outlook is a bit more bullish than some of your colleagues. what are you saying in the second half of 2013 that others are not? >> on a very short-term basis, we have noticed there are a couple of things. the fiscal cliff. we cannot get out of the way of that. if you look at to the second half of 2013 that we can get some resolution, we may not like the total resolution, but if we can, you move past a period of uncertainty. three things have started in 2012 that could accelerate in 2013. housing is key. cheryl: it has done incredibly well this year. >> the second aspect is what is going on with the energy field, in terms of technology and energy less dependence for the u.s. the third factor is what is going on in manufacturing. you can talk about the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you can get the u.s. economy past this model through environment, you will see a slight acceleration in the second h
that if you don't deal with it you will send the united states back to recession and the global economy is teetering on recession. the stakes are in their political vaults. maybe they're blind to the enormous stakes. >> let me share something that struck me from pimco, the world's largest bond investor. they make informed bets on economies. here's what bill gross said about what's going on now in the u.s. he said, these structural headwinds cannot just be wished away as we move forward. whether it be to the right, the left or dead center. those are things like growing debt, globalization, technology and our aging population. that speaks to something i have warned about repeatedly on the show. challenges to the u.s. economy are significant. they come from europe and asia, old infrastructure in the united states, massive debt. americans have a right to expect leaders to tackle large problem. as one of the leading authorities on financial crises, what do we do? >> i think this point that it's not just what happens this month how are we going to move forward, grow this economy because this
and the economy and jobs have been prumped by the politics of immigration. i think there are four paths. one could be the pass the senate not be taken up in the senate. there is a lottery that would flult raising the overall level of immigration. if there was an agreement to include that that bill could be passed. a second option which is what the president has ind indicated he favors is to link high skilled immigration with the dream act. so it is a broader solution around immigration. the third would be to say this deals with the 50,000, this deals with a million five. the third would be deal with 11 million which clearly we have to as a nation deal with and there is a desire now more than there might have been a month ago to do. that and i've heard a number of people talk about the need to take up the issue and called for a comprehensive solution. so that's third. the fourth path would be to say that this immigration path in the short run is challenging and build support for the senator warner's bill, such as regulatory issues and commercialization of research. those strike me as the four paths
is for the president if the economy slips into a recession. we are talking about 2013 having no growth. >> it would be horrible. >> yeah. so it's a little hard to see what the game is. as kim was mentioning, the president wants these tax increases. it seems to me we will go through this sort of scorpion dance the rest of the year. what did the president campaign on? what was the one thing i think most people would say that he campaigned on? that was raising tax rates on the wealthiest, the two top rates. that's the thing that i think is on the table. and the -- >> but the republicans put that on the table. >> the republicans have put that on the table. >> at least through deductions. debate the rates or deductions. but they are willing to put it on the table. the question is what do the president give the republicans in return, if anything? >> i think that's what the republican position should be. say we have committed to what you campaigned on. if you are not willing to talk about reducing spending, then we aren't going to be able to do a deal with you, and i think that puts the political onus to
british law. >>> the asian development bank has raised this year's outlook for five emerging economies. its board members cite strong growth in southeast asia, especially in the philippines and malaysia. the bank's board members revised their estimate from 5.6% in october to 5.9%. the five countries are the philippines, malaysia, indonesia, thailand, and vietnam. the bank official said third-quarter expansion in the philippines was high at 7.1%. they said rising consumption and public investment in malaysia is contributing to the region's growth. the story was different for japan. they lowered their 2012 growth estimate by 0.6 percentage points. they cited a drop in exports stemming from a territorial dispute with china. the bank officials say southeast asian economies are supported by solid domestic demand. they added the countries are relatively unaffected by the debt woes in europe. >>> as if to back up the ad bcs's projection, japan's economy remained out of steam in october. the latest key economic indicator fell for the seventh straight month. the cabinet office says the coincide
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low taxes or the economy won't flourish, but i guess in my mind i think of traditional economy being the post-new deal economy of relatively robust high tax rates on high earners and a social safety net that is part of the social compact. to me that's tradition. that's 80 years. >> that's american. and i've -- you know, i've been working at investments -- well, really i bought my first stock when i was 11 but i started selling stocks when i was 20 and i sold stocks when personal income tax rates got as high as 91%. i've sold them when capital gains rate got as high as 39.6% and we had some wonderful periods of growth and g.d.p. and the middle-class as well as the rich prospered when tax rates were much higher than they are now. >> jon: well, we'll take a commercial and come back and talk about an op-ed that you wrote which laid out some of the math of this and some other financial going on in the world. we'll be right back. more from warren buffett and carol loomis right after this. (cheers and applause). >> jon: welcome back, we're talking with warren buffett and carol loomis. you k
street. in washington, posturing politics and high-stakes poker with america's economy at stake. president obama's initial offer on the fiscal cliff was resoundingly rejected by republicans. it included a $1.6 trillion tax increase, double what he campaigned on. also included $400 billion in entitlement cuts eliminating the need for congressional approval to a raise the debt ceiling. the markets rebounded later in the week following the latest hopes on a fiscal cliff agreement. america's economy grew at a faster pace than initially expected in the third quarter of the year. the second reading of the gross domestic product showed it at rate of 2.7% spurred by stronger inventories and exports. the securities and exchange commission is looking for a new chairman. mary shapirp schapiro announcin she will step down after nearly four years on the job. the obama administration says it will announce a replacement in the near future. >>> starbucks has a new way to spend a lot of money. it is introducing the most expensive blend made from a rare costa rican variety named geisha. it is $7
cuts and a weak economy. it is the lowest since 1950. to reverse the trend is a major breakthrough. yes, we are talking about deficit deduction. we are talking about raising revenue to a level in which can begin to support the kinds of investments we need to make to train our future work force and to create an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier.
ago there were only 1 billion active participants in the global economy. it was really just the u.s., western europe, and japan. today there are 4 billion people participating in the economy. we have got the same antiquated tax system today that we had 20 years ago. we should be taking the opportunity there to look this thing and say, what does it take to be globally competitive today? yes, i was on the commission, and some might think i like that proposal a lot, which i did. it does not have to be exactly like that, but there are some principles that are a part. -- that are important in there. the whole idea of during individual corporate cap gains, do it all at the same time make sense. the territorial system for companies makes sense, with clauses so that nothing -- nothing screwy happens. then we relook at all these deductions, and we should be looking at do we want all these at a time when our economy needs more flexibility to respond to a very globally different place than we had 20 years ago. it is -- to pass up this -- i think it a shame to pass up this opportunity to actu
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